Posts Tagged ‘Mott The Hoople’

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Mott The Hoople Gets The Word Out Pt. 1

February 10, 2013

A brief look at some of the print advertising used to promote various Mott The Hoople albums back in the 1970’s.

MTHad

Mott The Hoople - Insert Back (1)

mott-atlantic

Mottjapan

MTHcover

oaaa_mottthehoople2

 

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Marketing Rock Old School Style Pt. 2

February 22, 2012

Back in the 60’s & 70’s, decades before the internet and instant access to information, a lot of us didn’t know when bands were putting pout new albums until we heard them on the radio. Some advanced news would filter in a head of time, minimally, in places like Scene, Creem, Circus, Trouser Press, Rock Scene, Hit Parader, etc…


For those of us who bought all those magazines and tabloids (Rolling Stone, Melody Maker, New Musical Express, Sounds) we’d often get advance word that a new album was being released by the record company advertisements that were placed in the media. They were usually timed to see print just weeks prior to releases so we’d have a heads up on what was coming out.


Here is a second round of some random samples of various advertisements hyping new album releases from back in the day as seen in various music publications.
Click on images to enlarge!

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Rock ‘N Roll Eye Candy

January 3, 2012

The previous post featuring the Sunset Strip in 1974 sparked some memories after seeing the Mott The Hoople and David Bowie billboards. I can remember once in the mid-1970’s driving north to Cleveland and being shocked to see a billboard along I-71 advertising KISS’ Destroyer album. I knew they had the coolest rock ‘n roll billbaords in New York, London and L.A. cause magazines like Creem, Circus, Hit Parader and the like would on occasion publish a photo of one. Seeing rock ‘n roll themed billboards promoting new albums and upcoming concerts (World Series of Rock, etc…) would be a bit more frequent over the next couple years around Cleveland and Akron but like all things, they too faded.

Here’s some billboards from ‘back in the day’, the glory years of rock ‘n roll. Click on images to enlarge!

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Time Traveling

December 19, 2011

The Sunset Strip in LA in 1974. Photo taken by the great Larry Jandro. Bet there were some amazing gigs happening in LA the day this was taken.

Click on image to enlarge!

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The Ballad of Mott The Hoople

October 21, 2011

 

Finally! Start Productions recently announced The Ballad of Mott The Hoople, the long awaited documentary on one of the 70’s more influential bands, was released on DVD in the United Kingdom on October 10 and will be available here in the States on November 14, 2011. Last week (October 11) the film was part of the New York Film Festival at the Walter Reade Theater in New York City.

Mott The Hoople Then

The DVD contains a 12-page booklet with sleeve notes by Morrissey and a limited edition 5-set of postcards. Also, a very limited set of cinema posters is available from Start Productions website. You can also order the DVD from them, too as well as from the usual sources like Amazon, etc…
 
Besides tracing the band’s career in comprehensive detail the DVD also has a full slate of extras:
 
The 2009 Hammersmith Reunion features unseen live footage from the triumphant 40th anniversary at Hammersmith Apollo in 2009: Rock ‘n’ Roll Queen, The Moon Upstairs and I Wish I was Your Mother.

Mott The Hoople Now

All the way to Memphis/The Legendary Graceland visit. Leee Black Childers talks about the epic journey to get the band to Memphis for the gig at the Ellis Auditorium three days before Christmas. Ian Hunter talks about the time he and Verden made an impromptu visit to Elvis’s home, Gracelands.

Seadivers (the Mott The Hoople Fan Club) Chairman, Kris Needs talks about his early years watching Mott The Hoople & David Bowie playing his hometown of Aylesbury.

Mott The Hoople Then

The Clash’s guitarist Mick Jones talks about his experiences working with Guy Stevens.

Mott organist Verden Allen takes us around the bands old London haunts.
 
Ariel Bender, Morgan Fisher & Buffin talk about the bands opening night on Broadway and their run in with Led Zeppelin.
 
A look through their Mott The Hoople photo album as Mott Roadies Phil John & Richie Anderson narrate through Phil’s old Mott photo album.

Mott The Hoople Now

As you most likely recall in October 2009 the five original members of Mott The Hoople reunited for the first time since their breakup for five shows at London’s Hammersmith Apollo Theatre.   After tickets for the two original dates sold out, and a third date at the same venue was added for 3 October 2009. After that one sold out as well another two dates were added on 5 and 6 October. The special limited 3 CD-set recorded during the first show at Hammersmith Apollo was sold directly after those concerts.

Mott The Hoople also held a warmup gig prior to their five-night stand at the HMV Hammersmith Apollo in October. The show was held at the Blake Theatre in Monmouth, Wales on 26 September 2009.
 
The reunion made headlines all across the United Kingdom and was an unqualified success. Will there be another reunion set of gigs? Maybe in the USA? Not likely according to Ian Hunter on his website’s Horse’s Mouth column.
 
Tons of Mott The Hoople media coverage and videos out there on the internet. Hit up your favorite search engine and enjoy!
 

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Mom Was Too Hip To Be Square

October 14, 2011

This Sunday (October 16) will be four years since I lost my mother. So naturally when this time of year rolls around it’s only natural to think of her. She came to mind the other day when I was talking with someone and we got on the subject of music back in the 60’s & 70’s and how our parents used to holler ‘n bitch to ‘turn that damn noise down!!!’
 
My friend was astonished, amazed, when I told him that my Mom had bought me some pretty good records back then, a couple even became iconic.


Whenever Christmas or my birthday will come Mom would invariably ask me what I wanted. I always said, ‘Nuthin’!’ It would drive her crazy so usually, like for Christmas, I would end up with two or three albums, a couple shirts, pair of jeans, maybe a watch or wallet, a bottle of Hai Karate aftershave, or was it cologne? And a carton of Winstons.
 
Life was good.

It’s amazing the albums she came up with. I never specifically told her what to get but she always came through. I would imagine she consulted with someone to find out what bands I liked. I can honestly say I was impressed with every one she bought me.
 
But Mom, she always was pretty hip and had taste and always kept up with the latest fashions for us. Looking back that was pretty sweet of her to be like that, especially since all through school I usually was the one who had the oldest parents.


Now, Dad? Forget it! He’s still stuck in 1930! My grandparents were more hip than him and they were born in the 1800’s!
 
Shown here are the albums my sweet Mom bought me way back in the day.

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Mick Ronson Remembered

October 20, 2008
Mick Ronson - One of the greats!

Mick Ronson – One of the greats!

A recent conversation with a friend about Mick Ronson brought to my pal the startling realization that Mick Ronson has been gone for 15 years now which is hard to believe. Ronson was a gifted guitarist, arranger, songwriter and producer who made his mark in rock ‘n roll and to this day has a strong following. Ronson lost his battle with liver cancer on April 30, 1993 at age 47 but his accomplishments won’t soon be forgotten.

I first became aware of Ronson during his stint with David Bowie in the early 70’s as Ronson led the Spiders From Mars and helped Bowie construct more than a handful of now classic songs and albums, particularly The Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust & The Spiders From Mars. The first time I saw Ronson perform live was with Bowie and the Spiders on September 22, 1972 at the Music Hall in Cleveland, OH.

After Ariel Bender had left Mott The Hoople in 1974 Ronson joined the band in September of that year. I was ecstatic! One of my favorite guitar players was joining one of my all time favorite bands. I couldn’t wait for Mott The Hoople to tour the USA so I could catch Ronson with the band but alas, they never made a USA tour as Ian Hunter fell ill and soon after left the band with Ronson in tow.

When Ian Hunter started his solo career Ronson was on board and eventually the Hunter-Ronson Band started gigging throughout the USA and I was fortunate to catch several of their shows, the first on April 26, 1975 at the Music Hall in Cleveland, OH with the band Bonaroo as support.

A really cool gig I was fortunate to see up close was on June 18, 1979 at the Cleveland Agora with the Iron City Houserockers opening. Another reason I remember this gig is two days later my daughter was born two months early (and she spent consider time in an incubator at Akron Children’s Hospital)! Hunter and Ronson and company were just totally on fire that night and an appearance with the band by Ellen Foley capped a great night.

The Hunter-Ronson Band came back to the Cleveland area three months later headlining the Richfield Coliseum with the David Johansen Group. Hunter’s You’re Never Alone with a Schizophrenic was red hot in northeast Ohio and the band, once again, was on fire. Great show.

The last time I saw the Hunter-Ronson Band in its original incarnation was the following year when they returned to the Richfield Coliseum on June 7, 1980. The show was advertised with Hunter-Ronson headlining but when we showed up for the concert the promoters put Heart as the headliner. Mistake. While Heart did a great job, it was a bit of a let down and anti-climatic after Hunter-Ronson and associates had the huge crowd rocking the rafters. Intense performance by the band and Heart had to be dismayed following Hunter-Ronson that night.

I bought everything on vinyl that featured Ronson back in the day, including his solo LPs Slaughter On 10th Avenue and Play Don’t Worry. He continued working with a number of bands and performers but to me, his best collaborations were with Ian Hunter on his studio LPs and his, to me, classic live LP, Welcome To The Club.

For those unfamiliar with Ronson spend some time on the Mick Ronson website and find out how much of an impact he had on rock ‘n roll. His resume is one of the most varied and impressive of any rock ‘n roll guitarist. And be sure and check out Ronson’s daughter Lisa’ s band, The Secret Society (Lisa Likes Rock ‘N Roll, ya know!).

Yes, he was THAT good!

 

Ian Hunter & Mick Ronson - They had some great shows.

Ian Hunter & Mick Ronson – They had some great shows.

 

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Favorite Books Of My Youth Pt. 5

October 13, 2008

When word came out that this book, Ian Hunter’s Diary Of A Rock And Roll Star (titled Reflections Of A Rock And Roll Star here in the States), would be published in 1974 I literally haunted books stores, record stores and head shops for several months until I finally came across a copy either at (faulty memory here) Camelot Music in Akron or Arsenic & Old Lace in Akron. I read it several times over the ensuing months and next several years and it took a proud slot in my library at the time.

The book was originally published in 1974 and Ian Hunter chronicles Mott The Hoople’s November-December 1972 tour of the United States right after All The Young Dudes LP was released. It’s an inside look at touring and the rock ‘n roll lifestyle in 1972 and Hunter…ahem…rolls away the stone and leaves everything exposed that entails life on the rock ‘n roll road. It was critically acclaimed.

Unfortunately by the end of the decade it was gone, loaned to an acquaintance to never be seen again despite having loaned it to over a dozen people in the preceding years (Mott The Hoople were big time in Orrville, OH back then, especially from 1972-1975).

But one day in the winter of 1996 the wife and I stopped in Canton, OH at the Quonset Hut store and as I’m walking down an isle of CD’s there in a big display is a reissue (import) of Diary Of A Rock And Roll Star! I had no idea they reissued it but I immediately purchased it! Even today, it is among my other books and is still shrink wrapped! I haven’t even opened it in 12 years!

That is going to change in the next week or so, as soon as I find a spare evening I’m going to open it up and read it once again, for the first time in nearly 30 years. I think I was afraid to peel open the shrink-wrap and read it for fear it would be lost again. But I’m willing to chance it….!
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Albums My Mom Bought For Me

October 7, 2008

In less than 10 days it will be one year ago that I lost my Mom, so naturally she’s been on my mind a lot here lately. One memory that came back recently was when, after I became a teenager and she saw my growing record collection (and my sister’s and my brother’s), she would ask each Christmas for a list of three or four album titles, in case they were sold out of one or two selections. She would always make it a point to tell me to only expect o-n-e album, if any at all, yet invariably each year there would be two or three albums under the tree (it was that or another bottle of Hai Karate cologne!). Shown here is just a small random sampling of some of the albums my Mom bought me over the years.  Looking back she was younger than I am now when she bought these for me (she was in her early 40’s). God bless you Mom. You were always hip!

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Mott The Hoople…..Reunited In ’09?

September 25, 2008

Never in all my wildest dreams would I have ever thought it possible: A Mott The Hoople reunion? It just may happen.

 

Recently original member Verden Allen slipped the word during a radio interview that Mott The Hoople will reunite in 2009 for at least a couple of British gigs (possibly some USA appearances???) to celebrate the band’s 40th anniversary. 2009 will also mark Ian Hunter’s 70th (!) birthday.

 

As an a-v-i-d Mott The Hoople fan since 1971 I always figured they would never reunite, even temporarily, after years of reading interviews with Ian Hunter, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin and others, all stating that ‘le Hoople would never reform, regroup or reunite. Pete ‘Overend’ Watts’ adamant refusal to even discuss the possibility for the past several decades has almost become legendary.

 

One other clue: Ian Hunter, for years, has dismissed a Mott The Hoople reunion. But in a recent Horse’s Mouth entry on his website (where Hunter addresses and answers his fans), this occurred in the August 15 edition: “Willie Fae, Glasgow: ‘Rumours at fever pitch about a Mott the Hoople Reunion.’  (Hunter’s response:) ‘You never know, William. You never know….’” That’s as close to an admission as you’ll get!

 

Allen’s interview on the Rock The Mike show on BCB Radio, hosted by Mike Mitchell, revealed that tentatively the original five have agreed to reunite in ’09 with a couple appearances already scheduled for the London Hammersmith with additional venues to follow. Rumors persist of a possible album as well, a subject Allen teased. Some former members are also apparently rehearsing.

 

 

You can listen to the interview at: ROCK THE MIKE SHOW

 

For latest developments I suggest staying current with Ian Hunter’s message board. If they only do British gigs hopefully for us in the USA who can’t make it over we’ll have a new album as well as an eventual live album and a DVD would be nice.

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C’Mon! It’s Time!

August 16, 2008

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Ian Hunter Remembers Marc Bolan

August 14, 2008

Ian Hunter

Ian Hunter Remembers Marc Bolan

Ian Hunter without a doubt is one of my long time rock ‘n roll favorites, right up there with Lennon & Bolan. He has a kick ass website and one of the best features on it is a section called The Horse’s Mouth where folks like you and I can email Ian Hunter and read his responses. Pretty cool stuff and quite insightful for fans of Hunter, Mott The Hoople and Mick Ronson.

 

Back in 2003 just prior to the 26th anniversary of Bolan’s untimely demise I emailed The Horse’s Mouth to inquire if Ian Hunter had met and/or had any special memories of Marc Bolan. Ian Hunter replied thusly in the September 19, 2003 installment:

 

“He came into Air II once around the time of my first solo album. Never short of regal confidence he asked to be played something. We played him something and he turned to me quite somberly and said, ‘I must admit something Ian – I’ve always underestimated you.’ The song was ‘Once Bitten, Twice Shy’. That’s the only time we ever spoke.”

 

Check out: http://www.ianhunter.com

 

 

T.Rex's Marc Bolan.

T.Rex

 

 

 

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MOTT THE HOOPLE: BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE

August 13, 2008
Mott The Hoople ruled in north central Ohio in 1973.

Mott The Hoople ruled in north central Ohio in 1973.

BURNING DOWN THE HOUSE

 

One stadium venue that I, and many others, initially thought would make a great place for concerts was Paul Brown Tiger Stadium in Massillon, OH. Spacious and, even better, close to home (somewhere around 15 miles east of Orrville.) We finally got our wish in 1973 when the Edgar Winter Group, James Gang and Frampton’s Camel all appeared at the historic stadium named for football’s greatest coach and home for an Ohio powerhouse team (Massillon Tigers).

 

It took promoters some time and effort to stage the concert as many politicians, and the police, were against rock concerts. Eventually the politicians relented and then Mayor Mark Ross signed a permit giving the green light. Over 12,000 people were in attendance for that inaugural concert on July 21, including Rick, Roy and myself. It went off without a hitch and we thought we would have another concert venue close to home for big name acts.

 

A week later, July 28, a second concert was scheduled, one I HAD to see! Mott The Hoople, one of my favorite bands of the 70’s (and still today) was coming to headline along with the New York Dolls and Dr. Hook. I think half of my hometown of Orrville, OH turned out for that one. Even Cid-Mor and Gail, two female rockers, hitchhiked from Orrville to Massillon to see Mott The Hoople. Everything seemed to go along just fine, the music was great, the Dolls were insane and Mott The Hoople just, plainly speaking, kick-ass. What a show!

Later we found out that there were an abundance of calls to the police for a variety of complaints and reasons (to wit; drug overdoses, 5 men injured, 1 car theft, 1 grand larceny, 1 attempted grand larceny, 28 calls for trouble and a fire!). The city fathers, and especially the police department, were not happy.

 

 

An infuriated Fraternal Order of Police organization went to the mat with the city council and got concerts banned from the facility.

 

One reason was an attempt by non-ticket holders who tried to force their way in. Apparently the fence that was blanketed with some kind of material to obstruct the vision of those on the outside was set on fire. It wasn’t until the middle of the night we discovered the arson was set by some pissed off Orrville rockers who couldn’t get into the sold out event to see Mott The Hoople.

 

Thanks mainly to WMMS radio in Cleveland, the Orrville, OH rocker population, and most rockers throughout Wayne County, had Mott The Hoople fever. We had all the albums, bought the 8-Track tapes, played their songs on the jukebox at Gene & Kate’s Pool Hall in Orrville, you’re damn right we’re going to see them.

 

Despite their best efforts, and a bit of arson, the friendly police persuaded (by their oncoming presence) Slick, Bug and the others to hightail it the hell out of there.

 

Paul Brown Tiger Stadium was constructed in 1949 through the Works Progress Administration program. It is primarily used for football and is the home field of the Massillon Washington High School. The stadium holds 16,600 and is named after former Tiger and famous football head coach, Paul Brown.

 

 

Paul Brown Tiger Stadium - Mott The Hoople ruled here for a day, a day the music ended at this venue.

Paul Brown Tiger Stadium – Mott The Hoople ruled here for a day, a day the music ended at this venue.

 

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1970’s Outdoor Rock Concerts/Festivals: How Did I Survive?

February 14, 2008

1970’s Outdoor Rock Concerts/Festivals: How Did I Survive? – Doc Lehman

NOTE: Click on images to enlarge!

The Rolling Stones’ stage.

Back in the 1970’s if I wasn’t at a race track I was at a rock concert. In fact, my fever for rock ‘n roll was at thermo-nuclear proportions throughout the 70’s and I must have seen over 100 bands during that decade, many of them three, four, five, six and more times each! I recall seeing Aerosmith five times in one year once. And while my regular haunts to see rock concerts was usually the Akron Civic Theatre, Cleveland Public Hall, Allen Theatre, Music Hall, Cleveland Agora, Canton Civic Center and the Richfield Coliseum, I also attended numerous outdoor ‘festivals’ during the 70’s.

My run of huge outdoor rock concerts during the 70’s began in 1972. After the huge success of Montery Pop Festival and Woodstock in the 60’s, and despite the 60’s ending concert at Altamont Speedway with the Rolling Stones, big outdoor concerts or ‘festivals’ became the norm for much of the 70’s and my buddies and I were all for them.
 
1972:

After returning to Ohio in June after a three-month stay in Colorado I was lucky enough to attend several outdoor mega-concerts with my cousin Sue who is about six years older than I. My first outdoor concert was at the Akron Rubber Bowl on July 3 for The Faces and Badfinger and then a few days later on July 11, 1972 featuring the Rolling Stones with Stevie Wonder as support.

The Faces with Rod Stewart totally rocked the joint and Badfinger had a real good recepetion. It was my first ‘mega-concert’ and it hooked me. The icing on the cake came a week later when the Rolling Stones invaded the Akron Rubber Bowl.  By then I knew it was only rock ‘n roll, but I sure as hell liked it!


What was memorable most about this concert were all the details we learned afterwards. There was a riot going on! Apparently, according to the media the day after, police busted a little more than two dozen people for drug offenses and that incited a large portion of the crowd that was aware of what was happening. It was quite a scene and we later found out about the number of arrests and that seven police officers were injured. 42,000 rockers were there and yes, the massive numbers blew this then 14-year-old away!


Luckily my parents didn’t find out about the ‘hippie riot’ and the following month, August 5, 1972 to be exact, my cousin, her friend and my pal Mike H., were headed back to the Rubber Bowl for the Alice Cooper School’s Out show. Supporting acts were Dr. John and the J. Geils Band.   

Dr. John was better than I expected and prior to J. Geils starting their session lead singer Pete Wolfe came out on a Harley-Davidson, parked it center stage, bellowed something now forgotten to the crowd and it was on! I was a J. Geils Band fan from that day onward.

Alice Cooper was great. He had all the original members and the stage act was more than I expected. The hanging, the snake, ripping up huge Alice posters and throwing them into the crowd, throwing handfuls of dollar bills into the crowd and the musical performance just kicked ass all the way. The highlight was during the School’s Out encore when a helicopter flew overhead, started slowly circling the perimeter of the stadium and then strangely these white things started flowing out of the copter and floating down to the crowd.

Akron Rubber Bowl

My pal Mike was lucky enough to catch one and they turned out to be faux ‘lace’ panties with A.C. ’embroidered’ on them.

So cool.

The following week at the Rubber Bowl I was offered tickets but declined. Just couldn’t get into Yes and the Mahavishnu Orchestra. And who the hell was that warm-up act the Eagles?

A couple weeks later it was return trip to the Rubber Bowl for the Jefferson Airplane and damned if I can remember the support acts (it was one of those days, ya know?). What I do remember is partway through the Airplane’s gig something happened, didn’t know what at the time but there was a ruckus happening up front and then onstage. Next thing we knew swarms of police were headed for the front of the stage and this strange ‘smoke’ started filtering through the air.

It was tear gas as we soon found out the hard way. We left.

A couple weeks later Rolling Stone magazine reported the details of what happened (as did the local newspapers but not in as much detail). Long story short, apparently the tour manager got into it with the police and started shouting and calling them ‘pigs’. The cops were antsy because of a supposed bomb threat that was phoned in prior to the concert. It was on then and then the rocks started being heaved towards the cop cars.

Naturally band members went to assist their associate and when it was all over Grace Slick and Paul Kanter were maced and Jack Cassady was not only maced but hauled off to jail literally kicking and screaming.

I’m not sure but I think that was the last rock concert at the Akron Rubber Bowl until the late 80’s or early 90’s when Bob Dylan and Tom Petty played there. (I didn’t go to that one.)

1973:

The following year outdoor concerts were still available just not in Akron. Massillon, OH, home of Paul Brown Stadium, was the next venue to pick up the gauntlet and despite objections from the local police department and the Fraternal Order of Police I got to see the Edgar Winter Group, James Gang and Frampton’s Camel at Paul Brown Stadium just ten miles or so from home on July 21, 1973. Around 12,000 attended and it went off pretty much without a hitch.

But a week later another concert was scheduled for Paul Brown Stadium that I HAD to see! Mott The Hoople, one of my favorite bands of the 70’s (and still today) was coming to headline along with the New York Dolls, Rainbow and Dr. Hook. I think half of my hometown of Orrville, OH turned out for that one. Everything seemed to go along just fine, the music was great, Rainbow was exceptional, the Dolls were insane and Mott The Hoople just, plainly speaking, kick-ass. What a show!

Ian Hunter & Overend Watts of Mott The Hoople

Later we found out that there were an abundance of calls to the police for a variety of complaints and reasons (to wit; drug overdoses, 5 men injured, 1 car theft, 1 grand larceny, 1 attempted grand larceny, 28 calls for trouble) and the City of Massillon banished concerts from Paul Brown Stadium after that.

It was fun while it lasted.
 
1974:

When 1974 rolled around Belkin Productions in Cleveland had scored a deal with Cleveland Municipal Stadium, home of the Cleveland Browns and Indians, to stage rock concerts they dubbed ‘World Series of Rock’. The World Series of Rock were held for six years and I went to a majority of them.

The first World Series of Rock was held on June 23, 1974 featuring The Beach Boys with Lynyrd Skynyrd, REO Speedwagon & Joe Walsh. I didn’t have much interest in the Beach Boys but a buddy, Tim, was into them so we went. Skynyrd, REO and Joe Walsh were all good but I don’t remember much about the Beach Boys (it was the 70’s, ya know!).


The second one of 1974 that I attended was held on August 31, 1974 and headlined Crosby, Stills Nash and Young and damn if I can remember who the support acts were (another lost ticket stub!). I barely remember CSN&Y playing but I remember Neil Young being ‘so cool’ on stage.

Had tickets for the ELP headlined World Series of Rock but didn’t make it. The boss wouldn’t let me off work that day!

1975:

On June 1, 1975 my buddy Bill Evans and I headed off for Bowling Green University’s Doyt Perry Stadium in his Volkswagon for the Poe Ditch Music Festival that featured Golden Earring, Johnny Winter, Montrose, Styx, the Outlaws, Richie Havens, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Pure Prairie League.

Montrose in concert at Poe Ditch.Big crowd at Poe Ditch.

A hot day baking under the sun, but we were maybe 20 feet center from the stage on the football field surrounded by friendly and generous concert goers and one young lady in particular who spent most of the day topless. Never was a big Nitty Gritty Dirt Band or Pure Prairie League fan, or so I thought, but they put on a good show. The original Styx line-up was on hand and they were mildly OK and Montrose just kicked ass and Richie Havens impressed the hell out of me.

Guitarist Ronnie Montrose performs at the Poe Ditch Music Festival at the Doyt Perry Stadium on June 1, 1975.

An swarm of concert-goers crowd Doyt Perry Stadium for the Poe Ditch Music Festival on June 1, 1975. Of the estimated 33,000-40,000 people in the crowd, only 3,300 were students. Even worse, there was only one law enforcement offiver for every 6,000-7,000 people, as stated by then Wood Country Sheriff Raymond Coller in a BG News Article dated June 3, 1975.

But right as Golden Earring was getting ready to go on stage a thunderstorm hit and everything came to a screeching stop and that, putting it mildly, pissed a good portion of the crowd off. Thinking it was cancelled they launched beer bottles at the stage.We made our way through the crowd, headed for the parking lot and walked right past Johnny Winter who had just arrived. As we approached the car a group of fans set the press box on fire in protest and that was the end of rock concerts there.   NOTE: Awhile back there was an article published in a newspaper in the Bowling Green, OH area about the Poe Ditch Music Festival 35 years later. You can read it HERE.

On June 20, 1975 with nothing to do and no tickets, Flash talked me into heading to Pittsburgh for the Pink Floyd concert at Three Rivers Stadium. It was sold out but we found a deal with a scalper and took the show in. Never a fan, I went for the party and eye candy and actually had a good time. They be crazy in Pittsburgh but friendly as I recall.

 

 

 

 We were right down on the field not too far from the front of the stage, it was h-o-t as hell and the women were looking good (and nearly naked). 33 years later my memories consist of Aerosmith kicking ass with Steven Tyler wearing a skintight black outfit with a black cape! He looked like Batman but it was one of Aerosmith’s better gigs that I have seen. Foghat were awesome, Jim Dandy and Black Oak were insane and I recall Blue Oyster Cult getting a great reception. 

 

 

 

 

 A couple weeks later it was back to Cleveland Stadium for another World Series of Rock on August 23, 1975 that headlined Rod Stewart & the Faces. I had wanted to see the Faces for a long time and finally got my chance and it was worth the wait. Rod Stewart had 80,000 people on their feet all singing and dancing in unison. Stewart & the Faces gave an incredible performance that day in spite of performing in such a huge facility. Support acts were Aerosmith, Uriah Heep, Blue Oyster Cult & Mahogany Rush. All bands were great and I remember the lead guitarist Mick Box playing awesome lead guitar with a broken wrist and a cast on. 

’75 World Series of Rock headlining The Faces & Rod Stewart

Another shot ffrom The Faces headlining World Series of Rock

1976:    Outdoor concerts were minimal for me that year as a full time job hauling milk and a steady girlfriend kept me at bay for the most part (except for LOTS of indoor concerts at the aforementioned venues mentioned at the beginning of this missive). One outdoor concert that was highly enjoyable was the Mosquito Dam Jam near Warren & Cortland, Ohio at Mosquito Lake.   

Banner made for the occasion by Cindy Morelle & her posse of Orrville chicks.

The Mosquito Dam Jam was headlined by Blue Oyster Cult on August 28, 1976 with support acts Bob Seger, Starz, J. Geils Band, and I think Derringer and Styx (another lost ticket stub and fading memory, plus had a r-e-a-l good time that day!). This was another gig that seemed to have everyone from Orrville and Wayne County there as I recall. Another outdoor concert happened near Tiffin, OH (no ticket stub remains and I can’t remember the date). I only have vague memories of this but some enterprising promoters rented a farm with lots of wide-open land and off a bunch of us from Orrville went in Flash’s Lincoln Continental Mark IV (and a caravan of other cars followed). All we had was a flyer to go on and eventually we found the place but played hell getting to it. We had to park the car in a field, then walk through another large field, walk through some woods, cross a creek (no bridge), climb up a hill and at the crest was wide-open spaces and a huge stage.I don’t remember all of the bands but Foghat headlined over Bob Seger, Ted Nugent, Mitch Ryder and several other bands. A good time was had by all which accounts for my cloudy memories and lack of specifics.  

1977:  

1977 was a busy year of attending outdoor concerts at Cleveland Stadium. Most of the concerts drew close to 80,000 people. On June 5, 1977 we planned to see Aerosmith headline the World Series of Rock but they cancelled and Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes came on board with Ted Nugent, Nazereth and Todd Rundgren. 

Legendary Murray Saul of WMMS getting the crowd primed to ‘GET DOWN!!!’

1978: A ‘family tragedy’ you can call it kept me away from the July 1, 1978 World Series of Rock with the Rolling Stones setting an attendance record at 83,000. Tickets were a whopping $12.50. Kansas (yawn, according to a friend whom I gave the tickets to) were the support act. 

  1979:
 
My only World Series of Rock for 1979 came on July 28, 1979 with 80,000 jammed in for a bill that consisted of Aerosmith, Ted Nugent, Journey, Thin Lizzy and AC/DC. The top three all put on a good show but I recall being extra impressed with Thin Lizzy and AC/DC that day as I didn’t have the chance to see them too often.

 1980:   Even though 1980 wasn’t part of the 70’s I attended my last two outdoor concerts that year. As you can see going through this as the 70’s dwindled down towards the 80’s my outdoor concert attendance began to wane and that was due to marriage and a couple of kids. 

Legend Valley!

A couple weeks later it was back to Cleveland for another World Series of Rock that was held on July 19 and headliner Bob Seger put on one of the best concerts I had ever seen him do. More amazing because of the size of the venue he nonetheless had the place rockin’ along with J. Geils Band, Def Leppard & Eddie Money. 

 ©2008/2012 Doc Lehman/Bangagong! 

NOTE: I would encourage everyone to read the comments left here. Some great, funny & entertaining stories from other folks’ adventures at outdoor rock concerts. 

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My 70’s Rock ’n Roll Publishing Adventures

February 14, 2008

I always had a fascination with publishing and during the 1970’s I did several publishing projects throughout the decade after publishing two issues of a comics fanzine (more on that another time) in 1971 & 1972. With my life-long case of rock ‘n roll fever (Chuck Berry and I share the same birthday and the first time Lennon & McCartney ever played together as teenagers was the day I was born) at an all-time high in the 70’s I published numerous issues of two rock ‘n roll publications: Boxoffice Rock magazine (based on the northeast Ohio music scene) and Bangagong Magazine, published and distributed ‘national’ and featuring a more ‘international’ flavor that also went beyond rock ‘n roll.

 

 

ABOVE: The cover of Boxoffice Rock 6

 

While recently going through a couple of containers looking for photos for my recently passed Mother’s services I came across two errant copies of each magazine floating around in a container. Here you will find the covers in addition to an advertisement for the last issue of Bangagong that ran in a couple of various trade publications.

 

1981 was the last year I published Bangagong as my involvement with auto racing became more and more dominant. The issue of Boxoffice Rock you see here was the last issue as well (1980).

 

Bangagong was primarily a mail-order magazine and one of its achievements was a glowing and highly positive review of it in Trouser Press, one of my favorite magazines at the time. The only criticism that critic had of Bangagong was it was “too professional”.

 

 

ABOVE: Issue 7 of Bangagong Magazine.

 

I published, edited, wrote the majority of them and also did the layouts, all before home computers. It was a blast to read through them again and see what was happening musically, especially locally & regionally. Didn’t make any money but enjoyed the hell out of doing them.

 

 

ABOVE: An advertisement for Bangagong Magazine

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