Posts Tagged ‘Rolling Stones’

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Quoteable Charlie!

March 13, 2013

MickCharlie

“White drummers don’t swing, except for Charlie Watts.” -Keith Richards

“It’s Charlie Watts’s band — without him we wouldn’t have a group.” -Keith Richards

“Rock and roll has probably given more than it’s taken.” –Charlie Watts

“You don’t think I take this seriously do you – it’s just a fuckin’ rock n roll band.” -Charlie Watts

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KeefCharOld

KeithChar

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Now Serving Tea & Crumpets

February 10, 2013

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rolling stonesTEA

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You Gotta Start Somewhere!

January 30, 2013

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Rock ‘N Roll Eye Candy Part 4

November 19, 2012

Back on August 7 of this year we posted Rock ‘N Roll Eye Candy Part Three. We’ve stumbled across a few more so… here is Part Four and a few more billboards from ‘back in the day’, the glory years of rock & roll.

Click on images to enlarge.

And if you’re wondering why a hard rocker like myself would use a Bobby Sherman billboard it’s dedicated in honor of my very special ‘Birthday Sister’ Jeannie. I know, I know……

 

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50 Years Of Satisfaction!

July 12, 2012
 
The Rolling Stones are 50 years old!
Who’d thunk it?
50 years and still together.
A half century of rock & roll.
The Rankin photograph seen here was taken today, July 12, 2012 to note the first public appearance by the Rolling Stones at the Marquee Club on Oxford Street in London on July 12, 1962.
Been listening to them for 48 years. And have enjoyed every minute of it.
Thanks for 50 years of greatness, good times & outstanding music. R.I.P. Brian & StuKeith, the fact that you are still here and still ready to rock is the ultimate ironic & iconic statement that you could make at this point in time. You won!
Maybe sometimes you can always get what you want.
 
 
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Marketing Rock Old School Style Pt. 3

July 12, 2012

Back in the 60’s & 70’s, decades before the internet and instant access to information, a lot of us didn’t know when bands were putting out new albums until we heard them on the radio. Some advanced news would filter in a head of time, minimally, in places like Scene, Creem, Circus, Rolling Stone, Rock Scene, Hit Parader, Trouser Press, etc…


For those of us who bought all the magazines and tabloids (Melody Maker, New Musical Express, Sounds) we’d often get advance word that a new album was being released by the record company advertisements that were placed in the media. They were usually timed to see print just weeks prior to releases so we’d have a heads up on what was coming out.
 
Here once again are some random samples of various advertisements hyping new album releases from back in the day as seen in various music publications.

Click on images to enlarge!

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Rock ‘N Roll Eye Candy Part 2

July 11, 2012

Back on January 3 of this year we posted Rock ‘N Roll Eye Candy  Part One. We’ve stumbled across a few more so… here is Part Two and a few more billboards from ‘back in the day’, the glory years of rock & roll. Click on images to enlarge.

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Marketing Rock Old School Style Pt. 2

February 22, 2012

Back in the 60’s & 70’s, decades before the internet and instant access to information, a lot of us didn’t know when bands were putting pout new albums until we heard them on the radio. Some advanced news would filter in a head of time, minimally, in places like Scene, Creem, Circus, Trouser Press, Rock Scene, Hit Parader, etc…


For those of us who bought all those magazines and tabloids (Rolling Stone, Melody Maker, New Musical Express, Sounds) we’d often get advance word that a new album was being released by the record company advertisements that were placed in the media. They were usually timed to see print just weeks prior to releases so we’d have a heads up on what was coming out.


Here is a second round of some random samples of various advertisements hyping new album releases from back in the day as seen in various music publications.
Click on images to enlarge!

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Rock ‘N Roll Eye Candy

January 3, 2012

The previous post featuring the Sunset Strip in 1974 sparked some memories after seeing the Mott The Hoople and David Bowie billboards. I can remember once in the mid-1970’s driving north to Cleveland and being shocked to see a billboard along I-71 advertising KISS’ Destroyer album. I knew they had the coolest rock ‘n roll billbaords in New York, London and L.A. cause magazines like Creem, Circus, Hit Parader and the like would on occasion publish a photo of one. Seeing rock ‘n roll themed billboards promoting new albums and upcoming concerts (World Series of Rock, etc…) would be a bit more frequent over the next couple years around Cleveland and Akron but like all things, they too faded.

Here’s some billboards from ‘back in the day’, the glory years of rock ‘n roll. Click on images to enlarge!

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When ‘King Biscuit’ Was King Of Sunday Nite

December 9, 2011

Back in the 1970’s during the throes of my rock ‘n roll obsession  it was rock ‘n roll 24/7/365. I can remember attending three concerts in a week on occasion. Got all the albums, 8-tracks, posters, concert tickets, wearing apparel, just like you did. For the most part myself and friends, we worshiped at 100.7 on the dial, WMMS in Cleveland. And for most if not all of the 70’s a weekly feature that we always tuned in to (unless we were at a concert) was the Sunday evening broadcast of the King Biscuit Flower Hour, a syndicated radio program that broadcast concerts with the biggest bands in the land.
 
Sometimes we’d record them, I knew someone who damn near had a full library of King Biscuit broadcasts during the 70’s. I can recall recording a few, depending who the band was that night and if I was near a home based stereo. An old pal, Dave Corbett, recorded an Aerosmith King Biscuit concert on 8-track (!) and gave it to me. I wore it out.


 I can remember many a Sunday evening out cruising back roads with a carload of friends getting our minds right and listening, at maximum volume of course, to whatever band(s) were on that particular week.
 
The King Biscuit Flower Hour debuted on February 18, 1973 with Blood, Sweat & Tears, the Mahavishnu Orchestra, and Bruce Springsteen. Bill Minkin served as the show’s host from the debut into the mid-1990s and he became a familiar voice to us rockers out there. The show eventually was carried over 300 plus radio stations across the country.


 I can remember attending a couple shows at the Cleveland Agora that were recorded for King Biscuit Flower Hour broadcasts (Ian Hunter/Mick Ronson & Rockpile in 1979, for one).
 
The King Biscuit producers would usually show up with a mobile recording truck, record the concert, mix and edit it and then radio stations who participated would receive reel-to-reel tapes of the shows. The producers didn’t switch over to CDs until 1987. New broadcasts lasted until 1993.


 I had no idea the show lasted as long as it did. I figure I probably heard my last King Biscuit broadcast on the radio circa 1980 or so, but it was a nice diversion on a Sunday night, it was also a chance to record some live gigs by favorite bands for the cost of a blank cassette (it had to have been a bootleggers money machine back in the 70’s). I also recall that King Biscuit producers would manufacture albums for radio stations to broadcast that were meant for radio stations only but I recall buying a couple of them at record shops back in the day.
 
In 2006, the King Biscuit tape archives were acquired by Wolfgang’s Vault that began streaming concerts online and has made some available for download.

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Mom Was Too Hip To Be Square

October 14, 2011

This Sunday (October 16) will be four years since I lost my mother. So naturally when this time of year rolls around it’s only natural to think of her. She came to mind the other day when I was talking with someone and we got on the subject of music back in the 60’s & 70’s and how our parents used to holler ‘n bitch to ‘turn that damn noise down!!!’
 
My friend was astonished, amazed, when I told him that my Mom had bought me some pretty good records back then, a couple even became iconic.


Whenever Christmas or my birthday will come Mom would invariably ask me what I wanted. I always said, ‘Nuthin’!’ It would drive her crazy so usually, like for Christmas, I would end up with two or three albums, a couple shirts, pair of jeans, maybe a watch or wallet, a bottle of Hai Karate aftershave, or was it cologne? And a carton of Winstons.
 
Life was good.

It’s amazing the albums she came up with. I never specifically told her what to get but she always came through. I would imagine she consulted with someone to find out what bands I liked. I can honestly say I was impressed with every one she bought me.
 
But Mom, she always was pretty hip and had taste and always kept up with the latest fashions for us. Looking back that was pretty sweet of her to be like that, especially since all through school I usually was the one who had the oldest parents.


Now, Dad? Forget it! He’s still stuck in 1930! My grandparents were more hip than him and they were born in the 1800’s!
 
Shown here are the albums my sweet Mom bought me way back in the day.

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Blast From The Past

August 17, 2011

Here are a selection of handbills (flyers) and posters and advertisements hyping some concerts I attended back in the 1970’s. If there is enough interest I’ll scrounge through some boxes and files and try and find more to scan and post. Some f-u-n memories looking at these! Click on images to enlarge!

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An AMAZING Teacher Calls It A Day

June 1, 2010

Pat Warner & MARK FOWKES are both retiring this week after 36 years at OHS.

I was recently informed that Mark Fowkes is retiring at the conclusion of this school year. I think it will be a sad day for Orrville High School when Mark Fowkes departs as the school district will be losing a fine teacher.

I just want to take this opportunity to acknowledge him being such a terrific teacher to me when I was in high school. Even though he came during my junior year I took several of his (English) classes and can honestly say I learned a tremendous amount. In fact, I remember taking one of his classes (Science Fiction) twice! Although I received no credit for it the second time I still signed up for the enjoyment and debate.

How he put up with all of us longhair, hippie, freak types is beyond me. They surely didn’t pay him enough!

And that was the kicker with Mark Fowkes.  Whether you had long hair (guilty) or short hair, black or white, hippie, jock or redneck, he treated everyone the same, with respect, understanding and lots and lots of patience!

The biggest thing though as I look back was his demeanor. He was always so encouraging, positive and forthright with all of us. As I look back and I had two teachers who made a significant impact on me, one in grade school (Jill Hyde at Apple Creek) and one in high school. Mark Fowkes was the one in high school. I will never forget how encouraging he was to me in my writing and whatever creative binge I happened to be on at the time.

He was only a couple years older than my pals and myself and we all liked him, he was never patronizing. I remember right before school let out in 1975 when myself and a couple others tried, in vain, to talk him into going to see the Rolling Stones at Cleveland Stadium with us. He declined, I like to think reluctantly, and all these years later as I think back it was probably one of the wisest career moves he could have made!  I don’t mean not seeing the Stones, I mean seeing the Stones with us!

I also vaguely recall his reaction (amazement) when my buddy Flash and myself purchased three entire rows of the Richfield Coliseum for the ’76 KISS concert (their Destroyer tour). I think I offered him a ticket and stated that he should feel lucky because the tickets we gave away for free were to ‘foxes’ (that’s 70’s-speak for attractive young ladies) and we were charging the ‘dudes’. He declined again, the reason lost to time and fading memories, but again, retrospectively, a likely wise career move on his part.

Another memory that has never left me was when I submitted a required poem in one of my creative writing classes. The teacher, who didn’t care for me likely because I had longhair and was a smartass, thought I plagiarized it because it was….’good’ (Believe me, I ain’t no poet!). Good ‘ol Mark Fowkes went to bat for me and told her straight out that it was all my work because I had worked on it in his classes and I had him read it several times before I submitted it. The Courier published it!

Even though I never made it to college due primarily to an early marriage and children I was able to pursue a career in writing, public relations, marketing and promotions in motorsports that ultimately saw me inducted into the National Dirt Late Model Hall of Fame in 2006 along with numerous other awards and honors, including Media Member of the Year for five consectutive years by Racing America. I also had the opportunity to write for over a dozen national motorsports publications, write and produce a television show for three years, write, produce and co-host three radio programs with one being “national” and the chance to work with producers for over a year and then appear on a CNN special television program.

I also spent a few years as a features writer and columnist for the old Courier Crescent newspaper (in addition to freelancing to many other mainstream newspapers).

I owe all of this to Mark Fowkes and his encouragement 36 years ago. He was a motivator and always, always, always encouraging! I can sincerely say that my working life would have taken another direction without Mark Fowkes’ influence and encouragement. I have no complaints!

I had been published pre-Fowkes, but as I waffled about whether or not to try and get published in larger publications, he was the kick in the ass I needed at the time. He prodded, cajoled, encouraged and pushed.  Heeding his advice to go for it, in ’75 I became a features writer and columnist for The Journal, a Canadian tabloid devoted to popular culture. It was on after that.

Never one to have much confidence in myself, it was his encouragement and counsel that made me pursue my first love of writing; first in graphics oriented publications and then rock ‘n roll publications in addition to motorsports, which I pursued relentlessly upon getting married and starting a family.

Now ‘retired’, I am currently working on two books. The first has already been accepted. And I truly owe it to the inspiration and encouragement and infusion of confidence of Mark Fowkes all those years ago.

I just want to acknowledge the amazing impact and influence Mark Fowkes had on me that has carried through into my ‘old age’. He was always friendly, compassionate, sincere, encouraging and never patronizing to any of us. And I doubt he had a group of students who were as …’rambunctious’… as my pals and I were (it was the 70’s, after all)! I thank him for having patience with us!  Actually, God bless him for having patience with us!

He was not only one of the best damn teachers I ever had, he was also at the time a friend and a mentor. And I am willing to bet there are more of us out there that has similar stories.

Orrville High School is taking a hit, a loss, with his retirement and I regret my five grandsons won’t have the opportunity to learn from him. He is, and was, truly a gifted teacher.

Doc Lehman

Class of 1976

The famed Orrville bridge in ’76 that OHS senior paint each year. It didn’t stay this pristine for long – the graffiti bandits (guilty!) soon attacked!

More Orrville, Ohio and Orrville High School related posts on this website can be found here:

Power To The People, Baby! 

Where’s That Confounded Bridge?

‘Big Time’ Rock N Roll In A Small Town

Big Business Godzillas Local Landmark Theatre

Biology & Rock ‘N Roll ‘Literature’

I Liked Paul Lynde Before I ‘Met’ Him

My Last Rock Concert Promotion

My Mom Was On The Mike Douglas Show

With A Name Like Smucker’s The Beatles Have To Be Good!

DAMAGE: Ohio 70′s Bands

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Albums My Mom Bought For Me

October 7, 2008

In less than 10 days it will be one year ago that I lost my Mom, so naturally she’s been on my mind a lot here lately. One memory that came back recently was when, after I became a teenager and she saw my growing record collection (and my sister’s and my brother’s), she would ask each Christmas for a list of three or four album titles, in case they were sold out of one or two selections. She would always make it a point to tell me to only expect o-n-e album, if any at all, yet invariably each year there would be two or three albums under the tree (it was that or another bottle of Hai Karate cologne!). Shown here is just a small random sampling of some of the albums my Mom bought me over the years.  Looking back she was younger than I am now when she bought these for me (she was in her early 40’s). God bless you Mom. You were always hip!

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‘Big Time’ Rock N Roll In A Small Town Pt.1

September 7, 2008

Terry Knight of Terry Knight & The Pack

Way back in the early 1960’s at the Atlantic-Richfield gas station on West Market Street in my hometown of Orrville, Oh ‘sock hops’ were held during summer evenings. I was too young to attend but my older brother and sister went to them. A couple years later a couple dances with live bands were held in the parking lot on the north side of Smith’s Grocery on South Main Street and even though I was too young to attend I do remember one dance in particular, circa 1966, that my sister and her best friend attended that featured Terry Knight & The Pack.

 

Dad & Mom drove Cheryl and her friend, also named Cheryl, in to Orrville and dropped them off at Smith’s while the rest of our family went several blocks away to my uncle and aunt’s home until the dance was over. Another uncle & aunt were there so eventually a cousin and myself walked up Oak Street to Main Street to Clyde Matthew’s Union 76 gas station to get a bottle of Pepsi. Several blocks south we could hear the music so we decided to walk down and take a peak.

 

Once we got near Smith’s Grocery (we were across the street and intimidated by all those rowdy teenagers) we hung around for about a half hour and watched the band and the high schoolers having a good time before walking back to our uncle’s.

 

After the dance both Cheryls walked up to where our uncle lived and man were they exited! Terry Knight & The Pack (never heard of them prior to that night) had a couple records being played on Cleveland radio and to the two Cheryls they were big stars! You’d have thought they died and went to heaven (they had some of their 45 singles).

 

Fast forward to 1971 and I’m a typical male teenager into Grand Funk Railroad. I knew they were managed by Terry Knight but imagine my surprise when, after reading various articles and interviews with Mark, Don and Mel in Creem, Circus, Hit Parader and Rolling Stone I discovered that Grand Funk’s Mark Farner and Don Brewer were in Terry Knight & The Pack! Cripes, I saw 2/3 of Grand Funk Railroad several years prior and didn’t know!

 

Not long after that discovery I was able to catch Grand Funk Railroad in concert in Cleveland and I think somewhere around ’73 or ’74 I caught them in Indianapolis when a carload of us went to see them.

 

Terry Knight, from Flint, MI, was a DJ in the early 60’s (including a stint at the legendary CKLW and credited as the DJ who broke the Rolling Stones in the USA – some referred to him as the ‘Sixth Stone’) before deciding to become a ‘rock star’. He started Terry Knight & The Pack in 1965 and served as frontman and singer with Don Brewer on drums, Mark Farner on bass, Carl Johnson on guitar and Bobby Caldwell on keyboards.

 

At least a half dozen of their records made the Top 40 regionally (Detroit, Cleveland, New York) and among the singles were Mister, You’re A Better Man Than I, I (Who Have Nothing), This Precious Time, I Can’t Get No Satisfaction, Tears Come Rollin’, How Much More, Better Man Than I, and the song they are most identified with, A Change On The Way.

 

Soon after Farner took over as lead guitarist.

 

The band was big in Cleveland and appeared numerous times on Don Webster’s UPBEAT TV show and throughout the region opened for bands like the Rolling Stones, Yardbirds, Dave Clark Five and others.

 

By the end of ’67 Knight left for a solo career as a singer (that failed) and producer (that succeeded). As a producer/manager he helped put together Grand Funk Railroad with Farner, Brewer and bassist Mel Schacher in 1968 and took them to the top before a major falling out in 1974 that resulted in Knight more or less retiring from the music business.

 

Knight, born Richard Terrance Knapp, was born April 9, 1943 and was tragically murdered on November 1, 2004 by his daughter’s boyfriend. The boyfriend, out of control on drugs, was fighting with his daughter when Knight stepped in to protect her. He was stabbed 17 times.

 

I always thought my first ‘big time’ concert was Alice Cooper in Akron after that band made it big (I had seen them prior to becoming superstars at Chippewa Lake Park) but perhaps, in retrospect, my first was really Terry Knight & The Pack.

As far as I know the next ‘big time’ name band to play Orrville was Kim Simmonds’ Savoy Brown on September 1, 1979 at Wayne County Speedway.

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