Posts Tagged ‘T.REX – MARC BOLAN’

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Albums My Mom Bought For Me

October 7, 2008

In less than 10 days it will be one year ago that I lost my Mom, so naturally she’s been on my mind a lot here lately. One memory that came back recently was when, after I became a teenager and she saw my growing record collection (and my sister’s and my brother’s), she would ask each Christmas for a list of three or four album titles, in case they were sold out of one or two selections. She would always make it a point to tell me to only expect o-n-e album, if any at all, yet invariably each year there would be two or three albums under the tree (it was that or another bottle of Hai Karate cologne!). Shown here is just a small random sampling of some of the albums my Mom bought me over the years.  Looking back she was younger than I am now when she bought these for me (she was in her early 40’s). God bless you Mom. You were always hip!

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Ian Hunter Remembers Marc Bolan

August 14, 2008

Ian Hunter

Ian Hunter Remembers Marc Bolan

Ian Hunter without a doubt is one of my long time rock ‘n roll favorites, right up there with Lennon & Bolan. He has a kick ass website and one of the best features on it is a section called The Horse’s Mouth where folks like you and I can email Ian Hunter and read his responses. Pretty cool stuff and quite insightful for fans of Hunter, Mott The Hoople and Mick Ronson.

 

Back in 2003 just prior to the 26th anniversary of Bolan’s untimely demise I emailed The Horse’s Mouth to inquire if Ian Hunter had met and/or had any special memories of Marc Bolan. Ian Hunter replied thusly in the September 19, 2003 installment:

 

“He came into Air II once around the time of my first solo album. Never short of regal confidence he asked to be played something. We played him something and he turned to me quite somberly and said, ‘I must admit something Ian – I’ve always underestimated you.’ The song was ‘Once Bitten, Twice Shy’. That’s the only time we ever spoke.”

 

Check out: http://www.ianhunter.com

 

 

T.Rex's Marc Bolan.

T.Rex

 

 

 

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Proof I Am So-o-o-o-o Old!

August 5, 2008
Ringo Starr's granddaughter Tatia Jayne Starkey, 19, the first Beatle grandkid, has recently formed her own band.

Ringo Starr’s granddaughter Tatia Jayne Starkey, 22, the first Beatle grandkid, has recently formed her own band.

If you are a baby boomer this will make you feel R-E-A-L  O-L-D! Ringo Starr, now (gulp!) 68, was the first Beatle to become a grandfather when his son Zak Starkey now (gulp!) 43, currently the drummer for The Who, had his first child, a daughter named Tatia Starkey, born on September 7, 1985. Word has now come out that Tatia, 22, has started her own band dubbed Belakis.

 

Are we really that old? A Beatle grandkid playing in a band?

 

Tatia, who looks a lot like Grandpa Ringo, never took up the drums like Dad and Granddad, instead she is a bass player and it’s being reported a pretty good one at that. Tatia’s band has already performed some gigs in London and studio recordings and more dates are in the works.

 

….Sigh….

 

And while we’re on the subject of Beatles and Bingo Ringo (as Marc Bolan dubbed him) it was 37 years ago this past Sunday (August 3) that Ringo got his first gold record as a solo artist for his hit 45 “It Don’t Come Easy”, written by Ringo with George Harrison on guitar. It’s also one of my all time favorite songs and the lyric, “You gotta pay your dues if you want to sing the blues”, has been adopted by me as a personal philosophy to live by.

 

Interestingly, on that same day that Ringo got that gold record Paul McCartney announced the formation of his first post-Beatles band, Wings. The original lineup included his wife, Linda, ex-Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine and drummer Denny Seiwell, who’d played on McCartney’s Ram album.

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My 70’s Rock ’n Roll Publishing Adventures

February 14, 2008

I always had a fascination with publishing and during the 1970’s I did several publishing projects throughout the decade after publishing two issues of a comics fanzine (more on that another time) in 1971 & 1972. With my life-long case of rock ‘n roll fever (Chuck Berry and I share the same birthday and the first time Lennon & McCartney ever played together as teenagers was the day I was born) at an all-time high in the 70’s I published numerous issues of two rock ‘n roll publications: Boxoffice Rock magazine (based on the northeast Ohio music scene) and Bangagong Magazine, published and distributed ‘national’ and featuring a more ‘international’ flavor that also went beyond rock ‘n roll.

 

 

ABOVE: The cover of Boxoffice Rock 6

 

While recently going through a couple of containers looking for photos for my recently passed Mother’s services I came across two errant copies of each magazine floating around in a container. Here you will find the covers in addition to an advertisement for the last issue of Bangagong that ran in a couple of various trade publications.

 

1981 was the last year I published Bangagong as my involvement with auto racing became more and more dominant. The issue of Boxoffice Rock you see here was the last issue as well (1980).

 

Bangagong was primarily a mail-order magazine and one of its achievements was a glowing and highly positive review of it in Trouser Press, one of my favorite magazines at the time. The only criticism that critic had of Bangagong was it was “too professional”.

 

 

ABOVE: Issue 7 of Bangagong Magazine.

 

I published, edited, wrote the majority of them and also did the layouts, all before home computers. It was a blast to read through them again and see what was happening musically, especially locally & regionally. Didn’t make any money but enjoyed the hell out of doing them.

 

 

ABOVE: An advertisement for Bangagong Magazine

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Biology & Rock ‘N Roll ‘Literature’

February 14, 2008

Way, way, way back in the early 1970’s when I attended Orrville High School I had a pretty good time (more on ‘good times’ another time soon) and for the most part the academic end of the high school experience came somewhat easy for me considering I never took a book home after my freshman year. I got decent grades, in some classes damn good grades, but there were two subjects that I just couldn’t get into no matter how hard I tried.

 

 

 

One was math, and the other biology. During my sophomore year biology was a required course and the lecture part of the class was taught by John Wiant who was a brilliant and extremely intelligent teacher but I just could not get into it.

 

 

 

After the first couple weeks it became obvious that I’d rather read my rock n roll magazines during class than listen to Mr. Wiant and take notes. A buddy of mine, who sat to the left of me, was Bug Jones and he shared my apathy for the subject.

 

 

 

To the right of me was a girl named Brenda S., a very pretty cheerleader who was pretty hip, too. She got Bug and myself through that course.

 

 

You see, why we laid back and read the newest issues of Circus, Creem, Rolling Stone, Rock Scene, Scene and the rest she was busy taking notes and when quiz time came around would pass her paper over to us to copy. Of course, we’d always miss a couple to get that ‘C’ grade as Brenda always got ‘A’s’.

 

 

 

The lecture class was held in the school auditorium and we sat back far enough that Mr. Wiant never realized, or let on, that while the majority of the class was doing the right thing (once we set a chair on fire, nevermind…..), Bug and I were reading about the latest exploits of Led Zep, Mott The Hoople, T.Rex, Rolling Stones, Montrose, David Bowie and the Spiders, Alice Cooper, Slade and all the rest.

 

 

 

We made it through the whole year reading rock n’ roll magazines and I passed with a ‘C’ on the year….thanks to Brenda S.!

 

 

 

 

I recall a lot of people used to borrow my rock magazines especially in study hall (hello Beth C.!). I tried to use study halls to do whatever homework was required for the following day because when that final bell rang for the day school never entered my mind until the next morning.

 

 

 

 

Throughout the 1970’s, until the end of the decade, I had complete 1970 runs of Circus, Creem and Rolling Stone with stacks and stacks of Hit Parader, Rock Scene, Crawdaddy and any others that came along that featured hard rock. Including stacks from the mid-to-late 1960’s.

 

 

 

 

I also purchased, when I was able and could find them, music newspapers/magazines from England like Melody Maker and New Musical Express, among others. Those two were, and probably still are, the top music rags in Britain and the newsstand store at Rolling Acres Mall in Akron back in the 70’s carried imported magazines including NME and MM, among the occasional other rock publication from the UK which I dutifully would buy.

 

 

 

 

I devoured all of those magazines from both sides of the pond and I think it was a huge influence after high school when I published Bangagong Magazine.

 

 

 

There were places around Orrville to buy the magazines, like Buehler’s grocery store, Bigler’s, and Dick Zarle’s drug store uptown (good ‘ol Dick once told me, I swear to God (!), “Hey, kid, this ain’t no library!”) and it seemed like the magazine rack at the Three Sisters Restaurant always had a good selection and often got them sooner than the other places in town, plus they were always open for breakfast as I headed for school (and sometimes stopped for breakfast, too).

 

 

Wish I still had all of them!

 

And rest in peace Lester Bangs!

 

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